Infrared Architectural Photo with Converted Nikon D100 Camera

I decided to take my LifePixel Infrared Converted Nikon D100 out of the bag and make sure it was still working properly. About 5 years ago LifePixel remove the Hot Mirror filter from the D100 and replace it with the Enhanced Color IR Filter
 equivalent to a 665nm Filter. The hot mirror normally filters out Infrared from hitting the sensor but that is exacitly what we want so it is replaced with a 665nm filter which removes most of the visible light and allows only Infrared to pass through to the sensor.
I used a Nikon 14-24mm f2.8 Zoom on the D100 but the focal point was not changed on the lens to properly focus the Infrared light as I also use the lens on my non converted D700 cameras. My backyard pool was very handy for the test besides it was too hot to go driving around looking for something else. The image SOC is slightly mis focused and also produces a soft image with low contrast and needs Photoshop enhancement to produce a good image. The following image was shot in raw and was opened in Adobe Camera Raw with a couple of minor adjustment to recover the highlights and exposure adjustments. As you can see it needs a lot more work to produce a good image but this is typical of unedited Architectural Infrared Photos.

Raw File From Infrared Converted Nikon D100

The next stop was to swap the red channel for the blue channel in photoshop and this results in the sky taking on more of a blue than the original red tone.

Now for the real fun. The photoshop layer is opened with Nik Silver Efex Pro 2 for the first round of adjustments. A Silver Efex Pro Neutral Preset is used as a starting point. Then global adjustments to the structure slider for the highlights to sharpen and remove the ghosting effect. A couple of local U-points are also placed on the pool deck to decrease the brightness and a couple of local U- points are used in the water to also reduce the darkness. The Silver Efex Pro adjustments are applied and saved as a layer in photoshop. The Layer mode is changed to Luminance to allow the color from the layer below to show but still retain the sharpness of the Silver Efex Pro adjustments.

Infrared Architectural Image with False Colors Edited with Nik Silver Efex Pro


For another Architectural Infrared effect without the false color the Silver Efex Pro layer is copied but the blending mode is left at normal.
Infrared Architectural Image Converted to Black & White with Nik Silver Efex Pro

Infrared Architectural Image Converted to Black & White with Nik Silver Efex Pro


For the last Architectural Infrared effect the previous Silver Efex Pro Layer is selected and opened in Nik Silver Efex Pro and the Light Blue Duo Tone slider is selected and the paper slider is made a bit whiter. This effect is applied and saved as another layer in photoshop.
Infrared Architectural Photo Converted to Blue Dou Tone in Nik Silver Efex Pro

Infrared Architectural Photo Converted to Blue Dou Tone in Nik Silver Efex Pro

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